(2016) New ‘Must-Read’ Books for Adults about Their Special Needs, by Nancy Schatz Alton

Published September 30, on www.ParentMap.com.

Kranowitz gives readers a new term to love: extrasensory grace, which “arrives when individuals with SPD learn to love their quirky selves and discover what they are meant to do and do well.”Read more

(2016) “The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up,” reviewed by Lorna d’Entremont

Published October 6, on Sentio Life Solutions, Special Needs Book Review

Are YOU the parents of a teen with sensory processing disorder, SPD? Are you constantly asking yourself, worrying and wondering if your child as he approaches adulthood will struggle with his sensory issues forever? What could you, his parents, do to help him develop well enough to function smoothly in daily life as an adult? The team at Special Needs Book Review highly recommends The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up.

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(2016) The Long-awaited Follow-up to the Million-copy Bestseller

Published May 24, on www.goodreads.com

The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up will be the new bible for the vast audience of parents whose children, already diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder, are entering the adolescent, tween, and teen years, as well as those who do not yet have a diagnosis and are struggling to meet the challenges of daily life. This book picks up where The Out-of-Sync Child left off, offering practical advice on living with SPD, covering everyday challenges as well as the social and emotional issues that many young people with SPD face.

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(2016) “The Out-of-Sync Child,” “The Out-of-Sync Child Has Fun,” and “The Goodenoughs Get In Sync,” by Terri Mauro

Reviews of books about and for children with special needs, on www.verywell.com

The Out-of-Sync Child (reviewed January 16):

In a nutshell: The Out-of-Sync Child was published when “sensory integration” was first being whispered about in parent support groups as an explanation for a grab-bag of confusing behaviors. [SPD] is now much more accepted as a diagnosis than it was then, and this book is revered as an essential parent resource.

The Out-of-Sync Child Has Fun (July 4):

“What can we do at home?” OTs have been giving parents informal answers to that question for years, jotting down lists so that the benefits of SI therapy can continue all through the week. The Out-of-Sync Child Has Fun functions as a scrapbook for all those ideas, from “finger paint with shaving cream” to “fill a box with rice.”

The Goodenoughs Get In Sync (reviewed June 30):

Filibuster’s a dog. Darwin’s a boy. And the Goodenoughs are a family with a spectrum of sensory problems that make them perfect for explaining sensory integration to children and helping them feel better about the way their own bodies work. Kranowitz wrote this book for children ages 8-12, and it breaks things down pretty nicely for their parents, too, with smaller-print sections that kids can skip.

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