Articles

(2011) Outstanding Book, by Sunity Murty, M.S., OTR/L

Published January 6, on PediaStaff.com

Carol and Joye have done a great job explaining the components of the nervous system, how they impact every day life and how to get them in sync to recognize, react and adapt to incoming sensory information. Components such as the proprioceptive, vestibular and tactile systems are clearly explained for anyone to understand. Additionally, balance, bilateral coordination, body awareness, directionality, laterality, midline crossing, motor planning, spatial awareness, acuity, binocularity and visual tracking are described with examples of everyday activities which involve these tasks. The authors do a nice job of showing how a simple task, such as getting out of bed, requires a complex array of systems including proper vestibular processing, proprioception, balance, motor planning, tactile processing and bilateral coordination.

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(2010) A Coordinated Effort for an ‘In-Sync Child’, by Mari-Jane Williams

Published November 4, in The Washington Post

In a hurry-up world in which doing more and doing it faster is often the goal for children no matter how old they are, authors Carol Kranowitz and Joye Newman are spreading a different message: Slow down.

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(2010) Growing an In-Sync Child: A Rich Resource Review, by Martianne Stanger

Published September 10, at Training Happy Hearts blogspot

I devoured Growing an In-Sync Child, co-written by the author of the well-known Out-of-Sync Child and Out-of-Sync Child Has Fun. Why was I able to devour it despite having two preschoolers and one infant with me 24-7? Because it is so easily read! (and it earns its first star for this.)

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(2016) “The Out-of-Sync Child,” “The Out-of-Sync Child Has Fun,” and “The Goodenoughs Get In Sync,” by Terri Mauro

Reviews of books about and for children with special needs, on www.verywell.com

In a nutshell: The Out-of-Sync Child was published when “sensory integration” was first being whispered about in parent support groups as an explanation for a grab-bag of confusing behaviors.

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(2016) The Long-awaited Follow-up to the Million-copy Bestseller

Published May 24, on www.goodreads.com.

The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up will be the new bible for the vast audience of parents whose children, already diagnosed with SPD, are entering the tween and teen years, as well as those who do not yet have a diagnosis and are struggling to meet the challenges of daily life.  Read more

(2010) Getting In Sync with Optometric Vision Therapy, by Leonard J. Press, OD, FCOVD, FAAO

Published August 8, on The Visionhelp Blog: Retrain the Visual Brain

Vision is acknowledged to be our most important sense for learning, so it would be logical to think that optometric vision therapy has a significant role to play in the field. We know that to be the case from research and clinical practice, but what do other knowledgeable and informed professionals have to say? One of the best-selling books about children’s development and learning in recent years has been Carol Kranowitz’s The Out of Sync Child. Since the book was published, we suggested to parents that they take a close look at it. It paints a very positive and well-balanced look at Optometry and Vision Therapy from the view of an authority in education and human development.

Now there is another source for parents to consult that takes the Out-of-Sync Child concept to a new level. Browsing the shelves of the Special Needs section at Barnes & Noble, I came across Growing an In-Sync Child

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(2010) Get Your Child Moving and Grooving, by Erin Tales

Published May 28, on TheMomBuzz.com

I am not big on self-help books. There are books for EVERYTHING when it comes to raising your child – from dealing with the birth, to potty training to dealing with tempers and bad attitudes. So, when Growing an In-Sync Child arrived at my door I honestly stared at it, thinking it was like many of the other parenting books that I’ve seen … which honestly usually read like a college text book.

But as I started reading, I was surprised as I nodded my head in agreement with the authors, Carol Kranowitz and Joye Newman. They wrote in a conversational style and were easy to follow as they explained the importance of being In-Sync.

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(2012) This Entire Set is Very User Friendly, by Elise Ronan

Published June 30, on PracticalAutism.com

There is no doubt that this entire set is very user friendly. The cards are listed in groups of beginner, intermediate and advanced. Each individual card comes with an explanation of the purpose of the activity. Every card has a supply list, which can include anything from “yourself” to a mini-trampoline to typical household items to requiring a trip to the hobby shop…NOT TO WORRY…there are so many activities to chose from that no budget gets overwhelmed.

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(2012) Help Children Develop to Their Full Potential, by Lorna d’Entremont

Published July 17 on Sentio Life Solutions / Special Needs Book Review

What can parents do to help children develop to their full potential? Remember Joye Newman and Carol Kranowitz and their highly regarded book, Growing an In-Sync Child? Now these experts in child development have come out with In-Sync Activity Cards.

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(2014) A Wealth of Activities, by Jennifer A. Janes

Published May 7, on Jennifer Janes’ blog

I was interested in In-Sync Activity Cards: 50 Simple, New Activities to Help Children Develop, Learn and Grow! as a tool to help me quickly find activities that would meet the sensory needs of my daughter. I wasn’t disappointed.

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(2016) How Sensory Processing Disorder Looks a Lot Like ADHD

A slideshow, published June 7 on ADDitudemag.com

Sensory Processing Disorder is not just about itchy tags. It is a complex and multi-faceted condition that is often mistaken for ADHD, anxiety, and other conditions.

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(2012) Working Out of the House — by Jenny Rough

Published in Bethesda Magazine, January-February

At some point during her 25 years of teaching music at St. Columba’s Nursery School in Northwest Washington, D.C., Carol Kranowitznoticed something odd: A number of the kids avoided the sandbox, finger paints and shaving cream activities. These were the same kids who didn’t respond to the piano.

When an occupational therapist came to the school, Kranowitz learned that these children had sensory processing disorder (SPD), a condition that makes it difficult to process information received through the five senses, plus movement/balance and body position.

“It explained the behavior of a lot of these kids—they were out of sync,” the Bethesda resident says.

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