Articles

(2010) A Coordinated Effort for an ‘In-Sync Child’, by Mari-Jane Williams

Published November 4, in The Washington Post

In a hurry-up world in which doing more and doing it faster is often the goal for children no matter how old they are, authors Carol Kranowitz and Joye Newman are spreading a different message: Slow down.

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(2010) Children’s Book on SPD: “The Goodenoughs Get In Sync,” by Lorna d’Entremont

Published June 6, on Sentio Life Solutions/Special Needs Book Review

Turn the pages of this six chapter book and shadow the Goodenough family for one harrowing day.  Meet the five family members who deal with different forms of SPD. Their solutions will help families coping with SPD to function in a “good-enough way” and learn how to get in sync. This children’s book will help siblings, classmates, and friends also learn about sensory issues that affect the behavior of many individuals.

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(2010) Help Your Child Develop Motor Skills, by Amy Phelps

Published April 29, online at MOVParent.com, and in the May issue of Mid-Ohio Valley Parent Magazine: Your Partner in Parenting

Child development occurs at different stages, but what can you do to help your child if he or she is a little behind, or “out of sync”? Based on the authors’ experiences working with children, this book gives you many different, fun activities to do with your children to help fine-tune their development skills.

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(2010) Being an Editor: A Feast for All Senses, by Marian Lizzi

May 4, published in Perigee Bookmarks: Improving Your World One Book at a Time

In my (gulp) twenty years as an editor of nonfiction, I’ve learned countless things from the authors I’ve worked with….  One of the most fascinating things I’ve learned comes from what also happens to be the first book I edited when I came to Penguin in the summer of 2004 — the revised edition of a special-needs bible called The Out-of-Sync Child, which has sold more than 750,000 copies to date.

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(2010) Growing an In-Sync Child: A Rich Resource Review, by Martianne Stanger

Published September 10, at Training Happy Hearts blogspot

I devoured Growing an In-Sync Child, co-written by the author of the well-known Out-of-Sync Child and Out-of-Sync Child Has Fun. Why was I able to devour it despite having two preschoolers and one infant with me 24-7? Because it is so easily read! (and it earns its first star for this.)

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(2010) Revelation from a Paper Plate

Published in S.I. Focus, Summer issue

Imagine coming to one of my “Getting Kids in Sync” presentations. You are here to learn new strategies for supporting children with SPD. At the door, you receive a warm welcome, a hefty handout, and two paper plates.

Get a cup of coffee and snack, but please, do not put food on the plates. We’ll use them in many different ways — just not for bagels and berries!

During our synergetic day, one activity is drawing on a paper plate.

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(2010) Two “Look-Alikes”: Sensory Processing Disorder and Attention Deficit Disorder

Published in National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Beginnings — A publication dedicated to the young minds of America from the NAMI Child & Adolescent Action Center, Summer issue

Brian is inattentive, impulsive, and fidgety. Does he have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder – or Sensory Processing Disorder? Recognizing the differences between these two disorders and providing appropriate treatment can greatly benefit children and adults like Brian.

Like ADHD, SPD is a neurological problem affecting behavior and learning. Unlike ADHD, SPD is not treated with medicine. Instead, occupational therapy using a sensory integration framework (“OT-SI”) helps most. This therapy addresses underlying difficulties in processing sensations that cause inattention and hyperactivity.

 

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(2010) Getting In Sync with Optometric Vision Therapy, by Leonard J. Press, OD, FCOVD, FAAO

Published August 8, on The Visionhelp Blog: Retrain the Visual Brain

Vision is acknowledged to be our most important sense for learning, so it would be logical to think that optometric vision therapy has a significant role to play in the field. We know that to be the case from research and clinical practice, but what do other knowledgeable and informed professionals have to say? One of the best-selling books about children’s development and learning in recent years has been Carol Kranowitz’s The Out of Sync Child. Since the book was published, we suggested to parents that they take a close look at it. It paints a very positive and well-balanced look at Optometry and Vision Therapy from the view of an authority in education and human development.

Now there is another source for parents to consult that takes the Out-of-Sync Child concept to a new level. Browsing the shelves of the Special Needs section at Barnes & Noble, I came across Growing an In-Sync Child

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(2005) Indoor Obstacle Courses for Parents and Teachers

Published in Sensations, Volume 3, Issue 2, September, a newsletter for the benefactors and friends of The KID Foundation (now STAR Institute for Sensory Processing Disorder)

 
Fish gotta swim, birds gotta fly, and kids gotta climb, jump, and balance. While dangling from banisters, scooting under turnstiles, teetering on curbs, and jumping into puddles may dismay grown-ups, children persist with good reason.

How do kids learn to think and relate to the world around them? By scanning their surroundings; touching wooden, metal, rubber, or concrete surfaces; grasping and releasing handholds; changing body positions; maintaining equilibrium; and experimenting with different movement patterns. Furthermore, they are having fun, and “fun,” Dr. Ayres wrote, “is the child’s word for sensory integration.”

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(2005) “Great SI Resources for Families” — Review by Trinell Bull

Published in Advance for Occupational Therapy Practitioners (February 21, 2005) Finally, a book written in […]

(2005) “A Wonderful Book” — Review by Jillian Copeland and Lois McCabe

Published in Washington Parent’s supplement, “All Kinds of Kids” (Spring/Summer, 2005) The Goodenoughs Get in […]